Hunt for the missing plane… part xxx


I know I am being a bit glib or flippant here, but I do not know what to make of all the contradictory commentary regarding the missing aircraft.

That being said, a new possibility has raised its head, and this has come from what might be considered unconfirmed reports by residents in the Maldives Islands. They reported seeing a low-flying aircraft at about 6.15 a.m. their time, and what stood out was the noise that caused many of them to go outside of their houses to find out what was happening.  Some of those residents reported that they saw what might look like the logo of Malaysian airlines… it sounds good and it sounds plausible.

As we drove towards Newcastle today in time for my doctor appointment, I mentioned this information to my husband. His response was quite interesting because he immediately mentioned that yes, if that was the case, then it is possible, even probably that the aircraft was headed for Mogadishu. Does that sound far-fetched?

As far as I can see, the reasons he discussed sound the most plausible of any explanation that I have read to date and it fits in with comments about the plane being high-jacked and that it was an act of piracy. Here are some things to consider:

1. What nation is thoroughly lawless?

2. What nation is responsible for piracy on the high seas?

3. What nation stood to gain most from piracy in terms of receiving ransom from governments and ship owners not willing to admit that there had been another hijacking on the open seas?

4. How effective has the effort been to stop the pirates from Somalia?

Now they were just the teaser questions, but we need to think about more possibilities with regards to Mogadishu being the intended destination for a flight that had been hijacked.

1. Mogadishu has a runway that is long enough for the aircraft to land and take off again.

2. Mogadishu has the aircraft hangers that could hide such a large aircraft whereas a lot of other countries do not have such facilities.

3. There is a need to get more money via hijackings but with the current blocks on shipping hijacks it means that the criminals need to try something new.

4. If the aircraft reached the Maldives by about 6.15 am then there was probably about 2 hours of fuel remaining. Looking at the map using the Maldives as a location where the aircraft was sighted, then there is a direct path to… SOMALIA.

Talk of finding debris in the Straits of Malacca could be just another furphy… or a false lead. Unless such debris is confirmed as coming from the aircraft, or I should say, unless the debris is found by searchers, then it is yet more noise.

The search is beginning to focus on the southern arc of the possible route, and that includes are region stemming for West Australia. I doubt that anything will be found since I believe that there are two other possibilities that are not being explored fully – one is a route to Somalia. The other is a route to a remote part of China. The Chinese are scouring their country using satellite data and so far have found nothing.. what about Somalia.

It is not beyond the realms of possibility that there is more than one government agency keeping quiet about what they really know, and that includes the way in which pirates normally attempt to secretly negotiate the release of their cargo…. this is just food for thought until something more positive turns up.

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