Category Archives: Iran

Signs of the downfall of a regime


Whilst the situation in Yemen has not yet been resolved (and Al Qaeda has taken over one town in the south), and the situation in Syria has been escalating, all eyes have remained on Libya. The so called Arab spring seems more like a springboard for Islamists to gain control of the Middle East. Whilst I still believe the National Transitional Council with regard to their motivations, I have always remained sceptical about Egypt, Tunisia, Syria, Yemen and a number of other M.E. countries where there have been uprisings. One could say that most of these people have been useful idiots. Libya remains a standout because of the nationalism that is involved (however, should the Salafists raise their ugly heads, then we will know the actual direction that things will take).

The example of the end of the Pavli  (sp) regime in Iran remains an example of what is normally expected when a dictatorship style of regime is about to fall. The Shah of Iran will be remembered for his secret police and the murders, imprisonments etc that occurred at the end, rather than the blossoming of the people. The same is true of Saddam Hussein – if he did any good, then that is forgotten by the fact that he secretly killed thousands in his dungeons.  Therefore when applying those standards to the situation that we are witnessing this year we can indeed show that in order for the regime to fall the following needs to happen:

1. Mass defections of the leadership

2. Mass defections of the military

When Pavli was sent into exile, the final step had been the defection of the military and his personal guard.  We also saw this when Muburak was hounded from office – the military told him to go. In the coming weeks I think we will see it in Syria and Yemen. Right now we are witnessing the defections in Libya.

In the past few weeks there have been some more high level defections. One of them was the man in charge of the Libyan oil company. Today there is an announcement that more than 100 people have defected including some generals and other army officers. One of the generals in this last group estimates that the strength of the armed forces remaining is about 20%. These officers have denounced the violence against women and fellow citizens in the various cities within Libya. They have called upon the remaining officers and military to do the same and abandon Gadhafi.

This abandonment by top military personnel should be the writing on the wall, but Daffy Duck in his mental state is being extremely stubborn. The head of the African Union, Zuma from South Africa, was engaged in talks yesterday. Nothing has changed because the African Union roadmap to peace had already been rejected by both NATO and the rebels. Gadhafi has lost all legitimacy to remain as leader in Libya. His military and his ambassadors have abandoned him. He needs to exit whilst he has the opportunity.

Once Daffy Duck has gone, we will then know more about the Libyan direction. The people in Benghazi do seem to be more pro-western. I assume that is because many of them have been educated in the U.K. or the USA. However, there are pockets of people who are Islamists and have associations with Al Qaeda. Will they try to take over the government? They might be too weak to have much influence, and only time will tell whether or not the Islamists will gain a foothold.  If the National Transitional Council is true to its word, then Libya will set the future standard for a Middle East style democracy.

However, there should be warning bells in regard to Egypt. The Muslim Brotherhood have been very crafty in that they have pretended that they will not seek election, yet they have formed a political party. There is also evidence of a rise in the activity of the Salafists. Egypt is following very closely the path of Iran prior to the takeover by the Mullahs. Stupid people like the present WH regime cannot see that there is a very real danger and that should MB become successful that Egypt will align itself with Iran. This is very much on the cards.

Other very worrying signs come from Tunisia, where the revolution had come from the people, but the Islamists and Salafists have been gaining a foothold in the towns, imposing their will on the people, and seem determined to take power and then force women to wear the black sacks of nothingness.  They are doing this by forcing out those imams who are what I would call moderate, and replacing them with hardliners.

Whilst I have not been dealing all that much with Yemen and Syria, there are some developments, especially in Yemen. Saleh is also on the ropes, and he refuses to leave power in Yemen. Over the weekend Al Qaeda successfully took a town in the south of Yemen. However, there are some who believe that this happened with the consent of Saleh so that he could try to prove that without him in power Al Qaeda would take over the country (more Arab spring). I do not know if that is true. Yemen is another country where the military have been abandoning the regime and are sticking up for the people.

In 2009 when there was an uprising in Iran because the election was stolen by Ahmahnutjob, the world turned its back on the people. There were protests, which from the point of view of those involved were peaceful, until the basijj showed up and started up the violence. Hundreds of Iranians were killed, and thousands were injured. It was not until Neda was gunned down that there was any real world focus on the events. Even then Angela Merkel had to prompt Østupid to say something and to denounce the regime violence agaisnst the people, and then he went back to doing nothing, turning his back on the Iranian people because he wanted to be friends with the regime. The human rights abuses in Iran are shocking. People were dragged from their homes, many were beaten in the prisons, forced to sign false statements, and many young women and young men were raped (some never recovered from their injuries, with at least one being dumped in a ditch at the side of the road). Then the hangings behind closed doors began, and even now we do not know how many have been killed by the Iranian regime since 2009.  If the military had sided with the people perhaps we would have seen the end of the regime, but you have to keep in mind that the Grand Pooh-bah, expecting trouble, had imported members of Hezbollah to do his dirty work. Syria is using the same tactics, using the basijj to do the dirty work.

Camping cannot compete against Ahmahnutjob when it comes to nutty theories


As you are no doubt aware predicted end of the world did not happen. This kind of thing actually helps to make Christians look bad. However, it pales into insignificance when Ahmahnutjob, the usurper President in Iran opens his mouth. Ahmahnutjob has been working towards his own target of a Middle East Armageddon. However, in his latest blunder and conspiracy theory he is blaming Europe for stealing Iran’s rain. Really? Yes, it is true, this nutjob is making even more outrageous statements and accusations:

 

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has accused Western countries of plotting to “cause drought” in Iran by using high tech equipment to drain the clouds of raindrops.

President of Iran Mahmoud Ahmadinejad speaks at the United Nations: Britain walks out of Iran's Ahmadinejad's anti-Semitic speech at UN

Mr Ahmadinejad says that European countries are using special equipment to force clouds to ‘dump’ Iran’s water on their own continent Photo: EPA
 

Moments after the Iranian president made the startling claim at the inauguration of a dam in a central province, it started to rain.

“Western countries have designed plans to cause drought in certain areas of the world, including Iran,” Mr Ahmadinejad said in the city of Arak in Markazi province.

“According to reports on climate, whose accuracy has been verified, European countries are using special equipment to force clouds to dump” their water on their continent, he said.

By doing so, “they prevent rain clouds from reaching regional countries, including Iran,” Mr Ahmadinejad charged.

Iran has experienced several droughts in recent years.

Mr Ahmadinejad also recalled an article by “a Western politician,” whom he did not identify, in which “droughts in some regions spanning from Turkey and Iran to east of Asia are predicted for the next 30 years.”

The regions (referred to in) the article … include countries whose culture and civilisation frighten the West,” Mr Ahmadinejad said in support of his argument.

Iranian leaders claim on a daily basis that Western countries, led by arch-foe United States, devise “plots” to undermine the Islamic republic and to impede its economic and scientific development.

They also accuse world powers of colluding against Iran’s national unity, independence, political establishment, culture as well as international relations.

 Need I say more about the absurdity of Ahmahnutjob? Camping cannot compete against this form of nutty comments.
 

Iran political atrocity


I hope to get more information about this particular case, but some of you might have heard about the case of a woman in Iran who has been sentenced to a “stoning to death”. This is a very gruesome method of punishing people, but in Iran and the Middle East it is a common punishment for alleged adultery.

This story is not about the woman, but it is about her lawyer, who publicized the case in the western world. The man has been sentenced to 11 years in prison, and he also faces being charged with treason (or something quite similar). However, the real atrocity is the way he has been treated since he was arrested:

Javid Houtan Kian, who represented Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, was jailed for endangering Iran’s national security and spreading propaganda against the regime, with a further charge of spying still under review by the prosecutor.

Since his arrest in October he has been burned with cigarettes on his legs, feet and testicles, and has had 12 of his teeth knocked out during bouts of torture, according to a letter written by Kian that was reportedly smuggled out of the jail earlier this year.

While Ashtiani’s situation was still unclear, sources claim that she had attempted suicide in March by slashing her wrists, but had survived.

Kian, who like Ashtiani is being held in the northwestern city of Tabriz, could face the death penalty if convicted of espionage.

Read more: http://www.news.com.au/breaking-news/iran-stoning-womans-lawyer-jailed-allegedly-tortured/story-e6frfku0-1226057736849#ixzz1MbULRKEG

 
Imagine how many other political prisoners in Iran get the same treatment. I had read about how many of the young protesters were treated. I had read about how some had their bodies dumped after they had died as a result of the torture that they endured. There was one very sad story about a young man who had been sodomized and he had to return home all guilt ridden and broken as a result of his experience.
 
 
 
 

The real new threat – and Østupid cannot stop them


There is an article at American Thinker that concerns the elephant in the room regarding Pakistan. This article deals with what I would call a lesson in political geography. The geography is important because of the nature of the regional players, and NO, I am not talking about Iran. The real threat is China.

Something that has concerned me over the past week has been the willingness of Pakistan to give to China the remains of the stealth helicopter. Have you ever asked why?

Also, China, along with Russia has been condemning the NATO action in Libya, when in fact NATO is enforcing the no-fly zone and is destroying the armanents of Daffy Duck in order to prevent him from killing those opposed to him (most of the Libyans). I would not be surprised to learn that somehow China has supplied extra arms, such as those landmines in the past few weeks.

The opposition of China and Russia to the action in Libya seems to be somehow related to their own relationship with Gadhafi. They are also opposed because they would not hesitate to crush their own people in the same way.

However, China suddenly has aspirations to be a major world power again. This seems to be something that has become obvious since the 2008 Presidential election. China obviously sees that right now it can bring down an enemy both in the financial sense as well as in the military sense. This is because Marxists are in charge of the White House at the present time.

It will be a good thing to keep a very steady eye on the activities of China. They are active with Iran (though the aspirations are different), Russia, North Korea, and they are making overtures to Afghanistan and Pakisan. Muslims seem to like Marxism but Marxism is incompatible to Shariah. However, Karazai is absolutely P’d off with Østupid and the relationship with Pakistan is fractured (which has not much to do with the killing of OBL but has to do with the drone attacks).  Pakistan has another very strong enemy in India, and India is also an economic enemy to China. Then there is the nuclear arsenal owned by Pakistan to consider.

The neophytes in the White House do not have a clue on how to go about things. They totally botched up their statements over the death of OBL. It will be this that will allow China to gain another foothold in its thirst for world domination. Never believe that China ever stopped those particular aims. It is not true.

Iran – more fun and games. Is it game over for Ahmahnutjob?


I have already mentioned that Ahmahnutjob went on an 11 day boycott recently before he returned to work. The subject of the crisis is the intelligence minister Heydar Moslehi, who was fired by Ahmahnutjob and rehired by the Grand Pooh-bah. This is very much a real power struggle. The man in question was not at the first cabinet meeting attended by Ahmahnutjob but appeared at the second cabinet meeting. Ahmahnutjob told him to leave, and now the Grand Pooh-bah has the poos with Ahmanutjob. (Yes I am deliberately not using their proper names because I am using ridicule towards both men).

The Guardian reports the following on the situation:

An unprecedented power struggle at the heart of the Iranian regime has intensified after it emerged that the supreme leader, Ali Khamenei, had given an ultimatum to President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to accept his intervention in a cabinet appointment or resign.

A member of the Iranian parliament, Morteza Agha-Tehrani – who is described as “Ahmadinejad’s moral adviser” – told a gathering of his supporters on Friday that a meeting between Ahmadinejad and Khamenei had recently taken place, in which the president was given a deadline to resign or to accept the decision of the ayatollah.

The extraordinary confrontation came to light after Ahmadinejad declined to officially support Khamenei’s reinstatement of a minister whom the president had initially asked to resign.

The rift between the two men grew when the president staged an 11-day walkout in an apparent protest at Khamenei’s decision. In the first cabinet meeting since ending his protest, the intelligence minister at the centre of the row, Heydar Moslehi, was absent and in the second one on Wednesday, he was reportedly asked by Ahmadinejad to leave.

In a video released on Iranian websites, Agha-Tehrani quotes Ahmadinejad as saying: “[Khamenei] gave me a deadline to make up my mind. I would either accept [the reinstatement] or resign.”

Although Khamenei is not constitutionally allowed to intervene in cabinet appointments, an unwritten law requires all officials to always abide by the supreme leader without showing any opposition.

(I think it important to note that Khamenei seems to liken himself to God, and calls himself “God’s representative on earth”, actually I think not, since only the Pope in Rome is God’s representative and Khamenei (the Grand Pooh-bah) is nothing more than an usurper. As a Catholic, I recognize the Pope as the successor of St. Peter who was appointed by Jesus Christ to be his representative until His return. No Muslim was ever given this particular appointment as the visier for Christ. However, I should add here, that I recognize that the Pope is a man, and that he acts only in a man’s capacity, but that is not the case with regard to how these mullahs see the role of the Grand Pooh-bah.)

Clerics close to Khamenei have launched a campaign to highlight his role in Iranian politics, saying that to disobey him is equal to apostasy, as he is “God’s representative on earth”.

Meanwhile, the president was reportedly absent from religious ceremonies this week at Khamenei’s house, where he was publicly criticised by close allies of the ayatollah. Iranian officials are traditionally required to participate in such ceremonies in order to cover up any political rift that might compromise Khamenei’s power.

Iran‘s semi-official Mehr news agency reported on Thursday that several members of parliament had revived a bid to summon Ahmadinejad for questioning over “the recent events”. It said 90 MPs had signed the petition, up from only 12 last week.

Under Iranian law, at least 85 more signatures are required for a possible impeachment of the president.

The accusation that is being made against Ahmahnutjob is a bit of a hoot, especially when it show the Muslim belief in such things as djinns.  It shows an immaturity that they would make this accusation in these circumstances. Ahmahnutjob is definitely weird, even crazy, but “using supernatural powers” as an accusation really sounds crazier.

Supporters of Khamenei say that Ahmadinejad is surrounded by “deviants” in his inner circle, including his controversial chief of staff, Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei, who wants to undermine the involvement of clerics in Iran’s politics. Mashaei and his allies have recently been accused of using supernatural powers and invoking djinns (spirits) in pursuing the government’s policies.

On Thursday, the commander of the powerful revolutionary guards, Mohammad Ali Jafari, was quoted by the semi-official Fars news agency as saying: “People [close to Khamenei] are not relying on djinns, fairies and demons … and they will not stand any deviation [of the government in this regime].”

Have another look at what is being said, and you will see the truth behind the struggle. It looks like Esfandiar Rahim Mashaei is attempting to limit the power of the mullahs. This is what has got them up in arms, and it is why they are making such an unrealistic and immature accusation. They are afraid of losing their powerbase. This is the same with the usurper Khamenei. In case you do not know the story, Khamenei had the real successor to Ayatollah Khomenei murdered and thrust himself into the role of successor. During the unrest in 2009 the people made it clear that they rejected Khamenei and his role as the Grand Ayahtollah.

It will be interesting to see the next twists and turns because this looks like a real power struggle between the religious and the secular. Since it was Khamenei who helped with the cheating in regard to those Presiedential elections, ensuring that Ahmahnutjob remained as President when the real winner was Mousavi, it really makes this power struggle very intriguing.

 

 

Does AQ have a relevant role in the current ME uprisings


The BBC asks the question about the relevance of AQ in the Arab Spring. Actually, I am going to disagree in part with some of the conclusions of the writer of the piece because I think that he has not been able to spot the influence of AQ in a couple of countries, such as in Morocco.  On the other hand, I note that one of his sources is a Libyan who is an ex-AQ operative:

What we are witnessing now is completely against their methods or understanding of how to make change,” argues Noman Benotman, a former Libyan jihadist who knew Osama Bin Laden in Afghanistan but now works at the counter-extremist think tank, the Quilliam Foundation.

Although Nato’s military commander talked of “flickers” of al-Qaeda in Libya, European officials say they see no signs of a significant presence for the organisation.

And while some Islamists, often former members of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group, are involved, they are seen as focused on confronting Colonel Muammar Gaddafi at home and not being subscribers to al-Qaeda’s wider ambitions.

Mr Benotman also says he has seen jihadists whom he knows in Libya change the way they behave and talk in the past two months.

“The way they start to make statements or to understand the conflicts is unbelievable, beyond my imagination. The only explanation I can offer is because they have been affected – whether they like it or not – by the wave of democracy.”

 These are the same points that I have raised about how these Libyans have been behaving. It would seem that they are only serious up to a point, at least for now, whilst they are fighting for their own country, and their own families.  (a bit different than fighting an alleged enemy in another country).

The author only identifies Yemen as having potential for AQ to exploit, but I disagree with him on that score. I would suggest that there is a possibility of AQ exploiting the situation in Syria as well as in Yemen. The reason is that the Salafists are tied to AQ. This is also true with regard to the control that Hamas wields over the Gaza strip, where they are being challenged by Salafists (which might explain the negotions between Hamas and Fatah – the Salafists being a common enemy to both). I think it is probable that the Salafists are behind the trouble in Syria – the Iranian Republican Guard has been in Syria and has been assisting with the bloody crackdown over more recent weeks that has led to a sharply increasing death toll in Syria.

Also, whilst AQ has been caught on the back foot, it would seem that the political aims of MB are coming to fruition in the region. I can see no real difference between the major aims of both groups, but I can see religious differences between them. This means that there is a double threat, from AQ as well as from MB, and perhaps the writer is blind to the influence of Muslim Brotherhood, as well as the inherent dangers of the rise of Iran that would be assisted if Muslim Brotherhood was to seize power in Egypt.

In Bahrain it would seem that the protests have been backed by Iran, and this explains the manner in which the crack down has taken place. Although the crackdown has been brutal it has not been as bad as in Syria or Libya were most of the deaths have occurred. It is hard to tell whether AQ has had a role in Bahrain, probably because those leading the protests have been Shia rather than Sunni. The Salafists and AQ tend to be Sunni.

The strongest evidence of AQ is in Morocco, and also in Germany, where there are sleeper cells.  A few months ago the Germans were on alert for a terrorist attack. Now comes the news that one cell has been busted in relation to that terror alert. There are sleeper cells in various countries, but this does not solve whether or not AQ is behind the Arab spring uprisings, or whether there are other agents of trouble, such as Iran, at work. I think it is a mixture, Iran, Communists, Salafists (AQ), Muslim Brotherhood, and other provocateurs. It is also probable that Russia has had a hand in the uprisings as well.

Power struggle in Iran?


The BBC is publishing the story. I saw this one at Hot Air. According to my understanding of the story  it looks like the Grand Pooh-bah and Ahmahnutjob are involved in some form of power struggle. It also looks like Ahmahnutjob could end up facing impeachment.

The president has not been seen at his office for eight days, missing two cabinet meetings and cancelling a visit to the holy city of Qom.

Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Khamenei, recently re-instated a cabinet minister he had pushed out.

Analysts believe an internal power struggle may be under way.

Parliament has tacitly threatened the president with impeachment, the BBC’s Mohsen Asgari in Tehran reports.

Intelligence Minister Heidar Moslehi was forced to resign on 17 April but promptly re-instated by the supreme leader.

Nearly 300 MPs urged Mr Ahmadinejad, in a letter, to respect Ayatollah Khamenei’s decision.

While the president has not been seen at government meetings, Mr Moslehi attended a cabinet meeting last Sunday, the Associated Press news agency reports.

One unnamed reformist politician told the BBC that a “game of chicken” had begun.

Østupid’s failure in 2009 to take a tough stance over the repression of the people of Iran could come back to bite him in the butt.