Category Archives: Pakistan

An arrest in Pakistan


A few days ago a member of the Saudi Arabia embassy staff in Pakistan was murdered thanks to two people on a motorcyle. It was a direct Al Qaeda hit upon an individual who was probably a member of the Saudi intelligence community. Today we have the news that a key member of Al Qaeda has been arrested in Pakistan. The BBC has the story and background of the man arrested by the Pakistanis.

Mohammed Ali Qasim, also known as Abu Suhaib al-Makki, had been working under al-Qaeda leaders along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border, a statement said.

The army said his arrest was a “major development in unravelling the al-Qaeda network operating in the region”.

Officials later told the BBC that Qasim was key courier between Osama Bin Laden and his deputy, Ayman al-Zawahiri.

However, security officials told the BBC’s Syed Shoaib Hasan that Qasim was arrested in Karachi’s central Gulshan-e-Iqbal district on 4 May.

He had a satellite phone and a tracking device, which they said had yielded new information about al-Qaeda’s activities in the region.

 

Qasim moved around Pakistan to avoid detection, living in Abbottabad – where Bin Laden was found – Faisalabad, Peshawar and Karachi.

He was involved in planning attacks on Saudi interests in Pakistan, and had ordered retaliatory strikes following Bin Laden’s death, the officials added. It is not known if these included the killing on Monday of Hassan al-Khatani, a security official at the Saudi consulate in Karachi.

Another security official told Reuters news agency that Qasim was between 35 and 40 years old and had been living in Karachi with his three children and wife “for some time”.

“He gave some information about movements of some people,” he said. “We are evaluating that information and planning actions.”

Qasim was allegedly close to Anwar al-Awlaki, the radical American Muslim cleric of Yemeni descent who is alleged to be a leader of al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, and Ramzi Bin al-Shibh, a senior al-Qaeda operative who was arrested in Karachi in 2002.

It is indeed interesting to not that this particular operative had been living in Karachi for some time. The presence of Al Qaeda is interesting because Karachi was also the scene of the attack on the Sri Lankan cricket team. It might also explain why there has been an upsurge of militancy in Karachi. Regardless, it looks like the Pakistanis were well aware of these people hiding in Pakistan and that they had been willing to shelter them whilst playing a double game with the West, and this is despite the more than 35,000 who had been victims of murder-suicide attacks.

Afghan Taliban had visited Abbottabad


If you think that Pakistan was not complicit in hiding OBL then think again. Here is an interesting report from the Telegraph which claimst that members of the Taliban visited OBL in the hideaway in Abbottabad. He communicated with a number of his followers by their visits. The person who gave the information is a Taliban leader who is considered a reliable source and who last visited OBL 2 years ago.

It is unbelievable to think that OBL was hiding in plain sight, and who had members of the Taliban visiting him, without the Pakistan military or the ISI knowing what was going on at their backdoor step. 

Somebody big was sheltering OBL at that location. The real giveaway has been a comment from the youngest wife, a Yemeni woman, who stated that Pakistan officials escorted her back in about 2003 and sent her home. This was about the time that OBL was hiding in the Tora Boras. It would seem that someone very high up in the ISI or the military was tipping off OBL, and that is how he escaped from the Tora Boras.

My money has been on Musharaf as the person who was assisting OBL, but I could be wrong. There is another name, someone who had been in charge of the ISI for a very short time, that has surfaced. It is more than likely that this is the person who was sheltering OBL and who set him up in Abbottabad under the noses of the military.

Pakistan has become increasingly militant and there has been a very dramatic rise in Islamisation of Pakistan. At the same time the Pakistan Taliban is intent upon seizing control of the government. If they succeed, they will do the same as the Afghanistan Taliban, where women are not allowed to work, and the hospitals where women give birth will become run down. It will also mean that any woman not wearing that weird get-up called a burka will be punished with beatings, or have acid thrown in their faces, as well as being seized from the streets, taken to prison and being tortured.

 

Chicago Terror Trial – David Headley called as a prosecution witness


The importance of this trial concerns what David Headley will testify about the Pakistan ISI complicity in the Mumbai massacre. It seems that Pakistan has been playing a double game, and now that OBL is dead the Pakistanis want to take their bat and ball and go home. There are many who are irate about the drone attacks in Waziristan (the Pakistan Govt know about the attacks but pretend otherwise). The anger is being stirred up by Islamists, members of the Pakistan Taliban and others.

The Mumbai massacre was extremely deadly and India certainly believed that members of the ISI were complicit. Headley, a Pakistani born American citizen is being called as a prosecution witness:

Mr. Headley told Indian investigators that the officer, known only as Major Iqbal, “listened to my entire plan to attack India.” Another officer with the intelligence service, the Inter-Services Intelligence Directorate, “assured me of the financial help,” Mr. Headley said.

As the United States presses Pakistan for answers about whether the ISI played a role in harboring Osama bin Laden, Mr. Headley is set to recount his story of the Mumbai attack in a federal courthouse in Chicago. What he discloses could deepen suspicions that Pakistani spies are connected to terrorists and could potentially worsen relations between Washington and Islamabad.

India, the site of the November 2008 attacks, will be monitoring the trial for evidence of the ISI’s duplicity. Pakistan will also be listening to — and is likely to deny — Mr. Headley’s every word. Islamabad has been dismissing his accusations against the ISI as little more than a desperate performance by a man hoping to avoid the death penalty.

Any new evidence of ISI malfeasance that emerges from the trial will reverberate in Washington, with the relationship between the United States and Pakistan at its most tenuous in years.

A growing chorus on Capitol Hill argues that the discovery of Bin Laden’s hideout and the evidence in Mr. Headley’s case leave no doubt that the ISI and its Pakistani military overseers have played a cynical double game with the United States. Pakistan has received $20 billion in military and development assistance since 2001, and its military, they say, has sheltered Bin Laden, supported Afghan Taliban who kill American troops and guided the militants who attacked Mumbai.

Mr. Headley himself is not on trial. But he will be the main witness against Tahawwur Hussain Rana, a Chicago businessman who is accused of providing financial and logistical support for the 2008 siege in Mumbai. The attack, a barrage of gunfire and grenades, killed at least 163 people, including six Americans. Mr. Rana’s defense is that he agreed to support Mr. Headley’s activities in India because he was led to believe he was working for the ISI, and therefore the Pakistani government.

 

Revenge killing


Today the Pakistan Taliban struck at a paramilitary academy, killing 69 people, including young recruits.

“The death toll is now 69, it was a suicide bombing,” said Nisar Sarwat, the police chief in the town of Charsadda, where the attack at the gates at the Frontier Constabulary took place.

Of the dead, 65 of them were paramilitary recruits on their way out of the academy on leave.

The Pakistani Taliban claimed the attack, calling it the first revenge for the death of bin Laden and threatened bigger attacks to come.

“This was the first revenge for Osama’s martyrdom. Wait for bigger attacks in Pakistan and Afghanistan,” spokesman Ehsanullah Ehsan told AFP by telephone from an undisclosed location.

Militants have killed numerous members of the security forces in attacks in the north-west over the past few years.

Keep in mind that the Pakistan Taliban and Al Qaeda had been working in tandem to topple the Pakistan government.  More than 35,000 Pakistanis who are mostly Muslim have been killed by these Muslims.

The real new threat – and Østupid cannot stop them


There is an article at American Thinker that concerns the elephant in the room regarding Pakistan. This article deals with what I would call a lesson in political geography. The geography is important because of the nature of the regional players, and NO, I am not talking about Iran. The real threat is China.

Something that has concerned me over the past week has been the willingness of Pakistan to give to China the remains of the stealth helicopter. Have you ever asked why?

Also, China, along with Russia has been condemning the NATO action in Libya, when in fact NATO is enforcing the no-fly zone and is destroying the armanents of Daffy Duck in order to prevent him from killing those opposed to him (most of the Libyans). I would not be surprised to learn that somehow China has supplied extra arms, such as those landmines in the past few weeks.

The opposition of China and Russia to the action in Libya seems to be somehow related to their own relationship with Gadhafi. They are also opposed because they would not hesitate to crush their own people in the same way.

However, China suddenly has aspirations to be a major world power again. This seems to be something that has become obvious since the 2008 Presidential election. China obviously sees that right now it can bring down an enemy both in the financial sense as well as in the military sense. This is because Marxists are in charge of the White House at the present time.

It will be a good thing to keep a very steady eye on the activities of China. They are active with Iran (though the aspirations are different), Russia, North Korea, and they are making overtures to Afghanistan and Pakisan. Muslims seem to like Marxism but Marxism is incompatible to Shariah. However, Karazai is absolutely P’d off with Østupid and the relationship with Pakistan is fractured (which has not much to do with the killing of OBL but has to do with the drone attacks).  Pakistan has another very strong enemy in India, and India is also an economic enemy to China. Then there is the nuclear arsenal owned by Pakistan to consider.

The neophytes in the White House do not have a clue on how to go about things. They totally botched up their statements over the death of OBL. It will be this that will allow China to gain another foothold in its thirst for world domination. Never believe that China ever stopped those particular aims. It is not true.

A chilling message


If you think that the world is safe now that OBL is dead, then you better think again. The fallout over his death is continuing. The latest fallout is a renewed threat from AQ groups in Somalia and Yemen. They are warning of a bloodier jihad to come. 

I doubt that the West actually understands the full nature of Islamic Jihad, especially as it has been interpreted by those loyal to OBL. It is necessary to read the history of OBL and his companions, and that includes their links to the Muslim Brotherhood. For example al-Zawahri is not only connected to MB but to the violent wing of MB (probably includes the Salafists). On top of that Zawahir is linked to the assassination of Anwar Sadat. We have to understand the full implications of that history. We also need to understand that OBL had those leanings when he was still a teenager, and that when he went to Afghanistan to fight the Russians, he took those ideas with him, thus converting mujahdeen to his way of thinking. Not all Afghan mujahdeen followed the philosophy of OBL. However, the Taliban is a direct descendant of OBL’s thinking and philosophy. This explains why the Taliban sheltered OBL in Afghanistan prior to the declaration of war on the USA when the twin towers were hit, and the Pentagon was attacked in 2001. That war has not ended by any stretch of the imagination.

The Australian Age reports:

Pakistan Wednesday saw the first possible violent reaction to bin Laden’s May 2 death in the Pakistani garrison town of Abbottabad, as drive-by attackers threw grenades at the Saudi Arabian consulate in Karachi.

The leader of Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, Nasir al-Wahishi, said in a statement posted on an Islamist website that the “ember of jihad (holy war) is brighter” following the May 2 killing of bin Laden.

The Yemen-based fugitive warned Americans not to fool themselves that the “matter will be over” with the killing of bin Laden, the Saudi-born architect of the September 11, 2001 attacks.

“Do not think of the battle superficially…. What is coming is greater and worse, and what is awaiting you is more intense and harmful,” Wahishi said, according to a translation by the US-based SITE monitoring group.

Top Shebab Islamists in Somalia, including Muktar Robow, Sheikh Hasan Dahir Aweys and US-born Omar Hamami — better known as Abu Mansoor al-Amriki — said they also planned revenge for bin Laden’s killing “very soon.”

“We are sending a message to (US President Barack) Obama and (Secretary of State) Hillary Clinton that we will avenge the death of our leader Sheikh Osama bin Laden very soon,” Hamami said.

“Osama is dead but the holy war is not dead. Mujahedeen fighters all over the world are fully prepared to revenge the death of our leader.”

The Shebab, who control much of Somalia, pose a serious security threat in the region where Al-Qaeda operatives bombed US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998.

The United States has warned of the threat posed by Islamist militancy in Yemen, the homeland of bin Laden’s father, and has warned of the potential for the country to become a new staging ground for Al-Qaeda.

AQAP was born of a January 2009 merger between the Saudi and Yemeni Al-Qaeda branches. It claimed a failed attempt to bomb a Detroit-bound US airliner in December 2009 and was accused in October of sending parcel bombs addressed to US synagogues that were disguised inside computer printers.

Four days after bin Laden was killed in the US raid on his sprawling compound about two hours’ drive from the Pakistani capital Islamabad, a US drone attack targeted US-Yemeni cleric Anwar al-Awlaqi in southern Yemen.

The imam, who Washington says has strong links to Al-Qaeda, survived the attack but two AQAP members were killed.

In Karachi, two men on a motorcycle threw two grenades at the heavily fortified Saudi consulate and escaped despite coming under fire from security guards, officials said.

“We are seeing this incident in the present context,” provincial government official Sharfuddin Memon told AFP. “It could be a reaction of the Osama incident.”

“We fear that desperate elements are planning to launch a big attack. We are taking precautionary measures in this regard,” he warned.

Pakistan outrage on raid deflated


As the relationship between the present White House regime and Pakistan continues to deteriorate, some new information has come to light regarding a deal that was made between GWB and Musharraf in 2001 and then reaffirmed in 2008 when Pakistan transitioned from a military junta to a civilian government.

The Guardian is reporting that the deal that was made gave the US unilateral permission to go into Pakistan and strike if they found out where Bin Laden was hiding. This deal was revealed to the Guardian by serving and retired military forces.

Under its terms, Pakistan would allow US forces to conduct a unilateral raid inside Pakistan in search of Bin Laden, his deputy, Ayman al-Zawahiri, and the al-Qaida No3. Afterwards, both sides agreed, Pakistan would vociferously protest the incursion.

“There was an agreement between Bush and Musharraf that if we knew where Osama was, we were going to come and get him,” said a former senior US official with knowledge of counterterrorism operations. “The Pakistanis would put up a hue and cry, but they wouldn’t stop us.”

The deal puts a new complexion on the political storm triggered by Bin Laden’s death in Abbottabad, 35 miles north of Islamabad, where a team of US navy Seals assaulted his safe house in the early hours of 2 May.

Pakistani officials have insisted they knew nothing of the raid, with military and civilian leaders issuing a strong rebuke to the US. If the US conducts another such assault, Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani warned parliament on Monday, “Pakistan reserves the right to retaliate with full force.”

Days earlier, Musharraf, now running an opposition party from exile in London, emerged as one of the most vocal critics of the raid, terming it a “violation of the sovereignty of Pakistan”.

But under the terms of the secret deal, while Pakistanis may not have been informed of the assault, they had agreed to it in principle.

A senior Pakistani official said it had been struck under Musharraf and renewed by the army during the “transition to democracy” – a six-month period from February 2008 when Musharraf was still president but a civilian government had been elected.

Referring to the assault on Bin Laden’s Abbottabad compound, the official added: “As far as our American friends are concerned, they have just implemented the agreement.”

The former US official said the Pakistani protests of the past week were the “public face” of the deal. “We knew they would deny this stuff.”